chronic-uterine

Published

The other day I was sitting with a friend and we were talking about life. Suddenly, I noticed that this woman walking past had been giving me a strange look for a few minutes. I asked my friend if she noticed and she said yes and that woman must think we were crazy. I started thinking about what she might have been thinking and my mind immediately went to words like "weird", "weird", etc.
Then I thought about how she might have felt if she thought those things. And then my friend spoke up and said, “She's scared. We look at her as if we are going to attack her”

I remember other instances where people looked at me the same way, not because they were afraid of me, but because they were worried about me. For example, when I first started wearing a hijab in public, people would often look at me with this worried expression on their face, like they wanted to say something but didn't know if it would offend me or not. .
When I think back to all those times, I realize that in most cases these situations reflect an unspoken dialogue between two parties: one who is concerned about the other, and who needs to be.

This phenomenon reminds me of a beautiful quote I read somewhere that has since become one of my favorites: “The best way to destroy an enemy is to make a friend of them. »

I'm sure our society could benefit from more friendships like these. Isn't that what we all want? Being around people who want us to succeed, because they care about us? What if someone was so happy in their life that they wanted others around them to feel the same? What if these people were actually able to do it? Wouldn't everything be perfect?
It may sound utopian, but it's important enough that I think we should think about it. How about trying to put it into practice?